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carol@inkwellcoaching.com

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October 17, 2019

A Story with Heart

When considering our health, so many times we think about starting better habits on Monday, or after a big celebration, or at the beginning of a new y

October 10, 2019

Ever Get Mad at…You?

I recently saw a post from a wonderful lady we’ll call Ann. (This is not her real name, so you can insert any name you prefer to use here. Maybe you

October 2, 2019

Managing Inherited Behaviors

Ice cream is still my favorite food. It has been my favorite food my entire life, as far back as I can recall. I firmly believe that my fondness for i

September 29, 2019

Fresh fruits and veggies, fish, good fats make healthy eating delicious

(The following article first appeared in the February 14, 2018 issue of Get Healthy, a publication of The Northwest Indiana Times. Online version) T

September 26, 2019

Applause for Your Consistency

Today, I acknowledge and applaud you for your commitment to consistency. Whether you consistently make a conscious effort to consume more vegetables f

September 19, 2019

No Time? Quick Meal Ideas

No time. Can you relate? I’ve been feeling the crunch of more scheduled evening events—and I no longer have kids going back to school! As I sat lo

September 12, 2019

The Biggest Nutritional Challenge

When it comes to losing weight and improving nutrition, what is the #1 challenge? Go ahead, take a guess. If your answer is, “I don’t know what I

September 5, 2019

Mr. Non-Compliant Ate Gross Greens

Miracles do happen and life is full of surprises. If your loved one is not keen on eating as healthy as you’d like, keep the faith. I offer you a st

August 28, 2019

The Other 84% of Health

In last week’s blog, I mentioned water intake, slower eating, and increased movement. Did you pick up on the fact that I never suggested WHAT to eat

August 21, 2019

Back to School, Back to Basics

When we break it down, practicing healthy habits is rather elementary. It can also seem rather complicated. Since school is back in session, I figured

A Story with Heart

When considering our health, so many times we think about starting better habits on Monday, or after a big celebration, or at the beginning of a new year, or…

I received an email after posting last week’s blog that sends a very clear message. That being the case, today’s guest blog is written by Mike, with permission.

Carol,

Good morning, Sunshine. Boy, you seem to know what to say and when to say it. I recently got out of the hospital after having an angioplasty on three of my arteries. One was 90%, the others were 80% and 60 % blocked (tell Mr. Non-Compliant that one). Anyway, I thank the Lord that I am here today. I had NO symptoms at all. They found it with a heart scan.

I’m thankful that our paths crossed. You have been an inspiration to me many times. Now I am on a strict diet of NO pork, red meat, no dairy and very limited carbs. I can have all the turkey breast, chicken and veggies I want– actually it’s not too bad. Also, I will be starting an exercise program after my cardiologist gives me the ok. 

When you are laying in bed in the ICU at 4am, you have a lot of time to reflect and finally realize: your mistakes in life; to turn toward the Lord for strength in getting through your trials; to quit relying solely on self; to realize you have had a support group this whole time that truly cares for you. 

If it’s possible for me to convey one message to people from this experience, it would be to love your family and friends with all your heart, put them before work or money, and make the changes in your habits that your body is telling you to make while you can.  

I was very blessed that this turned out the way it did. I was a walking dead man and did not know it.

I very much look forward to attending another of your classes. Tell Mr. NC hello and to get it together.

Mike 

Thanks, Mike, for sharing your story.

Blessings and love,
Carol

Love your family and friends with all your heart, put them before work or money, and make the changes in your habits that your body is telling you to make while you can.”–Mike

Ever Get Mad at…You?

I recently saw a post from a wonderful lady we’ll call Ann. (This is not her real name, so you can insert any name you prefer to use here. Maybe yours?)

She was extremely angry with herself for getting stuck OUT of her normal exercise routine—for two months.

As I followed this post along, others kept jumping in with similar feelings. Angry, mad, hating oneself–you get the idea. Falling out of a routine that helps us feel good mentally, physically, and emotionally, is the pits. It’s REALLY hard to get back in the groove.  

My word of the day: GRACE. Give yourself grace for being human. Give yourself grace for messing up. Give yourself grace because someone else could use some too.

We are SO good at beating ourselves up for messing up. I do believe we are better at forgiving others than we are at forgiving ourselves.

If you can relate, understand that we are all in this camp at one time or another. We are on a great roll (not the kind you eat) with eating nutritional food, moving, getting plenty of sleep, and then—BAM! Real life hits and we lose it.

In times such as these, give yourself the grace to do the next right thing. Maybe that means lacing up your favorite snappy sneakers and walking around the block for 5 minutes.

Or maybe you make a tossed salad for lunch and add one other vegetable into the mix. 

Or maybe you eat one cookie instead of 10.

The alternative: keep mentally beating yourself up.

You choose. You decide how you’d like to live your life today. Yes, you may mess up again tomorrow, or you may add another 5 minutes to your walk.

Do the next right thing. Trust me on this. You’ll feel happier, snappier, and more alive. And while you’re at it, encourage your friends to do the same. Sharing grace makes the world a happier place.

Stuck and can’t decide the next right thing? I’ll help you sort it out. Send me an email, as that is the next right thing.

Much love,
Carol

“Laughter is the key that grace has arrived.”– Anne Lamott (one of my favorite authors who admits to messing up sometimes)

Managing Inherited Behaviors

Ice cream is still my favorite food. It has been my favorite food my entire life, as far back as I can recall.

I firmly believe that my fondness for ice cream is sewn into my DNA as strongly as the color of my eyes. My parents were ice cream fans, hence, the inherited “ice cream gene.” 

So, what am I doing about it? We all know that ice cream is loaded with sugar, fat, empty calories, and provides no nutritional value whatsoever. I’ve tried “the cream provides calcium” reasoning. Lame.

We all have strong ties to some foods, behaviors, and ideas that we’ve grown up with. Think about it. What do you “blame” your family for?

Back to my “ice cream gene” behavior. Since I know that ice cream is a food that does not serve my health in a positive way, I’ve curtailed my consumption. If I were perfect, I would kick it out totally.

News Flash: I am not perfect, just ask Mr. Non-Compliant. I’ve been known to sneak a few of his M&M’s. There are some days I forget to eat a vegetable. Life Happens.

What I do is MANAGE my behavior in a way that better serves me. If I were to totally deny myself the pleasure of the occasional ice cream habit, the day would come that I’d go off the deep end and eat an entire half-gallon in one sitting. Not a good idea.

By carefully choosing when to enjoy my favorite food, I am still able to tie into all those great childhood memories that make me happy, and not feel deprived.

I DO NOT NEED ICE CREAM EVERYDAY. I used to think I did.

This, my dear reader, is progress. And this is how we manage those foods and behaviors that feel like they are such a strong part of who we are.

Incorporating our identity into ways that help us live and play full out is the ticket. It takes some creativity, and that is where I can help.

Together we achieve whatever it is that’s important for your health and well-being, in a way that is sustainable for you. I don’t do diets. I do “eat the best way for YOU.”

Let me know if you’d like to learn more about how we can work together. It begins with a complimentary conversation that dials into your unique “ice cream gene” traits.

Much love,
Carol

“Food is not rational. Food is culture, habit, craving and identity.”—Jonathan Safran Foer

Fresh fruits and veggies, fish, good fats make healthy eating delicious

(The following article first appeared in the February 14, 2018 issue of Get Healthy, a publication of The Northwest Indiana TimesOnline version)

There’s a video on the Internet that depicts why eating healthy can be a challenge. The setting is a 1970’s kitchen, complete with lime green cabinets. The wife has made her husband a beautiful breakfast of steak, eggs, toast, coffee and juice. As he sits down to peacefully enjoy this typical American meal, a man from the future continuously darts in with healthy food bulletins. Don’t eat the eggs; eat the eggs, but not the yolks; the entire egg is okay, but toss the red meat; no more toast; and so on. When did eating become so complicated?

 

Today I will give you a few tips so you may calmly enjoy your food as we did back in the day of lime green kitchens. Here are some simple ideas to get you started.

 

Avoid trans fats. These are “bad” fats. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ruled in 2015 that these artificial fats are not safe for consumption and gave restaurants and food companies three years to eradicate this health hazard. We’re not quite there and they are still in many fried, baked, and packaged foods. Be sure to scan anything you buy that has an ingredient label. These are commonly listed as “partially hydrogenated” and “hydrogenated” oils. Legally, a food can claim zero trans fat and have up to 0.49 grams per serving. Even small amounts play a significant role in cardiovascular disease. Beware of biscuits, cookies, crackers, non-dairy coffee creamer, fried fast foods, microwave and theater popcorn, margarine, to name a few. Choosing to minimize trans fats and all processed fats is a great way to love your heart.

 

The good news. As you seek out foods in the aforementioned categories that are made with real fat (such as butter, olive oil) instead of made-in-a-lab fat, you will begin to taste the difference. What about butter and oils for a healthy heart? Moderation and balance are key. The enjoyment and satisfaction level with real fat is much higher. Less is more.

 

Consume less sugar. Most Americans eat too much sugar. It is highly addictive and tastes delicious. From a health perspective, it’s a slippery slope. Increased blood sugar levels lead to poor heart health. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that men limit their intake of added sugar to 9 teaspoons (36grams) and women limit their intake to 6 teaspoons (25 grams) per day. For reference, a 12-ounce can of soda contains about 9 teaspoons. Added sugars include any type of sweetener, whether it’s honey, agave, maple syrup, cane sugar, etc., that is added by the food manufacturer or you. Artificial sweeteners are not the answer, as they are chemicals and introduce health concerns of their own.

 

The good news. Many fruits satisfy a sweet tooth and add fiber and nutrients as a bonus. Eating a sweet treat when the ingredients are real, (see recipe), along with a meal or snack that includes lean protein, vegetables and real grains, is not as tough on the body as having a donut and coffee in the morning on an empty stomach.

 

Minimize intake of processed foods. These typically contain preservatives, artificial colors and flavors, excessive sodium, and other chemicals that aren’t boosting us toward stellar health. Deli meats, bacon, pre-packaged and frozen meals and any food that is not in its natural form could be included here.

 

The good news. There are many foods that will boost heart health: fish (wild-caught) rich in omega-3 fats, such as Alaskan salmon, albacore tuna, Atlantic mackerel, sardines; one to two ounces of dark chocolate that has a cacao (or cocoa) content of at least 70%; a handful of raw nuts; avocados and avocado oil (good fats); a variety of fruits (especially berries) and vegetables in all colors; a glass of red wine (the best option for an alcoholic beverage). Consider following the Mediterranean diet guidelines, which is mostly plant-based (fruits and vegetables), includes whole grains, legumes, extra-virgin cold-pressed olive oil, fish, poultry, and limits red meat and sugar.

 

Tasty and healthy snacks. Homemade protein bars, hummus and guacamole with raw vegetables; almond or other nut butters with apples or pears; fresh berries with a drizzle of flavored balsamic vinegar.

 

As for the breakfast from the 70’s? The entire egg is full of nutrients. Skip the juice and eat a piece of fruit–more fiber, more filling. I’d put a splash of real cream in the coffee. Red meat on occasion and true whole grain bread would not upset future man.

 

In Conclusion. Make one change at a time, eat more food that is simple and real, and keep the balance. For those times when you are choosing a treat, here’s a recipe that is a big hit with my family. These are gluten-free, dairy-free (if you use non-dairy chocolate chips) and vegan. You don’t even need a mixer. Deliciously simple.

 

Quick and Easy Chocolate Chip Cookie Bites

 

  • 2 cups blanched almond flour*
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. baking soda
  • ¼ cup Earth Balance Soy Free Buttery Sticks** (melted)
  • 2 Tbsp. honey
  • 1 Tbsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/3 to ½ cup dairy-free semi-sweet chocolate chips

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Combine almond flour, salt and baking soda in a large bowl, using a pastry blender to break up any clumps of flour. Stir in melted Earth Balance, honey and vanilla with a large spoon until dough forms. Stir in the chocolate chips. If the dough seems dry and crumbly, add more honey or melted Earth Balance, a little at a time, until it is moist enough to stick together. (You may need an additional 1-2 Tbsp.) Drop by teaspoonful or small cookie scoop onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Gently press the dough flat.

Bake for 6 to 8 minutes, until slightly brown. Be careful not to overbake. Leave them alone to set and cool for about 15 minutes so they don’t crumble and break. Store in an airtight container in refrigerator or freezer.

 

*Benefits of using almond flour: lower in carbohydrates and higher in protein, fiber and healthy fat than some other flour options.

**Earth Balance is a blend of good oils. Butter may also be used.