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carol@inkwellcoaching.com

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The Buzz on Bone Broth

The Buzz on Bone Broth

Lately I’ve been using more bone broth, whether it’s Carol-made or a store-bought variety.

When comparing bone broth to basic broth or bouillon, bone broth comes out far ahead in the nutritional column, and is interchangeable in most recipes.

For example, here are a few highlights when comparing one 8oz. serving of Swanson chicken bone broth vs. Swanson basic chicken broth:

  • Bone broth has 8 grams of protein 1 gram of protein in basic broth
  • Bone broth has 350mg of sodium 860mg of sodium in basic broth
  • Bone broth has 35 calories 10 calories in basic broth
  • Bone broth has <1 gram of sugar 1 gram of sugar in basic broth

Bone broth is technically stock, since it requires the addition of bones. It is made by simmering bones, herbs, and vegetables for about 16-24 hours. This long simmering process produces a higher content of vitamins and minerals.  

Basic broth is lighter, and more flavorful, as it is cooked for a much shorter amount of time. The flavor comes from the meat, vegetables, and herbs.

They can be used interchangeably, although broth is better suited when the dish depends on the flavor of the liquid. Stock, or bone broth, is a bit thicker, and makes a good base for soups, stews, gravy, and cooking grains and legumes.

To Make Chicken or Turkey Bone Broth

  • Take the leftover chicken/turkey carcass, bones, neck, etc., and put it all in your crock pot.
  • Add a couple roughly chopped carrots, celery stalks, onions, and whole garlic cloves.
  • Thyme, rosemary and/or parsley may be added if desired.
  • Cover with water to within an inch or two from the top.
  • Add 2 Tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar. (This helps more nutrients to seep out of the bones and you won’t taste it.)
  • Cover and cook on LOW for 18-24 hours.
  • Remove the solids with a slotted spoon, allowing any stock to drain in another bowl. (There may be quite a bit of stock that collects in the vegetables.)
  • Discard the overcooked vegetables and bones. Run the remaining broth through a small strainer or cheesecloth to remove any leftover solids.

You now have delicious healthy bone broth to sip anytime, use as a soup base, or freeze for future use. This process works for all types of bones. If you get soup bones from your butcher, I read that if you roast the bones before making bone broth, the final product has a richer flavor.  

Note: When making broth from bones, you want to try and use bones that come from well sourced, organically raised, pastured or grass-fed animals, to avoid added hormones and antibiotics, and other nasty additives.

I like to cook my rice in bone broth for added protein and nutrition. A cup of bone broth tastes great as a snack on a cold afternoon, or with lunch.

Thanksgiving day, I tossed my turkey carcass and neck into my crock pot and made the stock. I used the stock the next day in my turkey pot pie. Yes, it was truly amazing!

Consider how making small changes like this, over time, lead to increased vitality and improved overall health.

If you’d like to learn more, contact me today!

Much love,
Carol

“Bone broth delivers a slew of healthy compounds like collagen, glucosamine, chondroitin, hyaluronic acid, plus a whopping 19 amino acids — all of which have been associated with several health benefits, such as improved gut health, joint function, skin elasticity, and a stronger immune system.”—Dr. Josh Axe

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